By Gideon Strauss

Artwalk at Plaza Las Fuentes

Artwalk at Plaza Las Fuentes


The Max De Pree Center for Leadership has shared a workspace with The Fuller Foundation for much of the Center’s existence. At the end of this week, The Fuller Foundation is moving out of these digs, and so are we. (A big, big thank you to The Fuller Foundation for their years of very generous hospitality.) As I mentioned in the first piece in this series, it is our intention to engage in a process of “Moving Out Loud”: thinking seriously about the meaning of this move and what our new workspace will communicate, engaging one another as colleagues as well as our surrounding community in a conversation about our new workspace, and documenting our thoughts and conversations here in Fieldnotes Magazine.

Reception and waiting area at the De Pree Center and The Fuller Foundation

Reception and waiting area at the De Pree Center and The Fuller Foundation

Moving from one workspace to another includes saying goodbye to things we’ll miss. My colleague Cathy Beaton writes: “Walking into the De Pree Center for the first time, I was struck by the elegance of the space: there was, well, space — lots of it. It was a gracious space filled with an abundance of natural light and wonderful views overlooking City Hall and vistas that stretched to the mountains of the San Gabriels to the peaks of Catalina on a clear day. It was furnished with elegant Herman Miller furniture, original Eames pieces, and there were original oils and watercolors on the wall. It also felt professional. Little did I realize that I would one day trade in my almost-corner office with a gorgeous mountain view to work at a workstation in the De Pree Center. While I no longer enjoyed a view from my desk, the setting more than compensated for what I gave up. I’ve become accustomed to the luxury of elegant spaciousness; the natural light and views (a necessity to a Hawaii-raised person!) have cheered me; the paintings (by Emil Kosa, a well-known California French-immigrant artist, I later learned) have become familiar friends. And I have come to love the transitional space between the garage elevator and the main lobby that allows me to gently shift from car culture to people space or vice versa. With its brightly colored tiles, playful protusions and indentations, and soothing fountains set amidst a garden, this artwalk forms a lovely bookend to my workday. I will miss parking at the far end of the garage just so I could enjoy walking its full extent.”

At work in the Small Conference Room

At work in the Small Conference Room

Cloud panorama from the De Pree Center office

Cloud panorama from the De Pree Center office

Clouds and snow on the San Gabriel Mountains

Clouds and snow on the San Gabriel Mountains

My colleague Stephanie Struck writes: “I very easily and clearly see God in sunsets, in mountains, in fluffy clouds and clear blue skies. I see God’s creativity, his sovereignty, and his care in nature. It’s not always easy for me to see God in paperwork, emails, and credit-card classifications. My favorite thing about the De Pree Center’s current (soon to be former) home is the abundant windows that remind me to take a deep breath, and remember that God is here in all that I do. The sunlight pouring into the office reminds me that God’s light pours into my soul as I serve him in my work. The view of mountains reminds me that God is beautiful and creative, and he created me for these tasks today. The sunsets and clouds remind me of God’s creativity as well, and also of his faithfulness in each new day of work and life. These sights of God quite often bring my heart to a posture of worship, as I realize God is big enough for whatever my day might hold. The incredible views of our office serve as a reminder in each moment that God’s greatness is present out there in the mountains and in here where His light reaches my very hands and mind.”

Crimson sunset viewed from the De Pree Center office

Crimson sunset viewed from the De Pree Center office

De Pree Center sunset view

De Pree Center sunset view

Yes, that view. I’ll miss it too.

Gideon Strauss is the executive director at the Max De Pree Center for Leadership and also editor of Fieldnotes Magazine.

Editor’s note:This article is part of an ongoing series related to the De Pree Center’s relocation. Read the rest of the related articles: Moving Out Loud 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

Fieldnotes Magazine is a publication of the Max De Pree Center for Leadership at Fuller Theological Seminary. We would love to hear from you about people, businesses, or other organizations we can interview or feature. Please email The Editor at Fieldnotes Magazine.

 

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